Some People Say It Better

From another expat site:

".....Nicaragua: Why We Chose and Love Nicaragua posted by majicjack I woke up one morning and decided I had worked 16 to 18 hour days long enough. We decided to sell our ranch and trucking business and look for a new place to live. We still have the royalties off of ten natural gas wells and 23 oil wells that did not go with the sell of the ranch. It was decided that if we stayed in the USA we would probably buy another ranch and start another business so we researched several different countries and chose Nicaragua. We were very tired of paying higher taxes for babies that were not ours, feeding people that were not legally qualified to receive it in the USA, paying for housing, medical, school for those that did not legally qualify, having my business over regulated and over taxed, supporting those that could but wont work. If you think this is the governments money, the government doesn't have any money it belongs to the people of the USA. The congress and senate of the USA has become impotent in their ability to help run a country, the president and attorney general are as crooked as snakes and totally ignore the constitution. The only thing politicians are in office for anymore is a power trip. The only difference between corruption in Nicaragua and the USA is, It is a hell of a lot cheaper here. I am not an overly religious person but I do believe in God. Here the government supports religion, I am not taxed to death, have more freedom than in the USA. I am totally nonpolitical in Nicaragua and plan to keep it that way. The last thing Nicaragua needs is Americans coming down telling them how to run their business. I fortunately do not have money concerns, but for those that do they can live here with some dignity on what ever retirement they have. In the USA many retirees would be on the poverty list in income. I have worked all over the world and the two on the short list were Vietnam ( I had served there) and Nicaragua. We are extremely happy that we chose Nicaragua. If you wake up in the morning and can see the forest and decide to explore it you can find many very good things about this country. Their culture is much older than ours and if they are happy with if you live here you should be also. This is their country and they are nice enough to allow us to share it is a plus. Opportunity abounds here but you have to work for it. There are plenty of people here that will gladly relieve you of every penny you have if you don't take care. To get anything done with the government is a nightmare but it can be done. Usually after you get through the initial process, it goes pretty smooth after that. I have a ranch and coffee plantation in the mountains and it employs 35 to 40 people. I pay better than the law requires here and have very good and happy workers. Here it is fun to work and in a much relaxed atmosphere. Most of these people here can learn if you will take the time to teach and you would be surprised how much you can learn from an illiterate 70 year old man or a 20 year old boy as far as that is concerned. Most are very hard working and honest and friendly. Our real love is a 6" gold dredge that we take to the mountains and jungles of Nicaragua. You get to meet some very interesting people and have some great adventures. It is very nice when people you have never met offer to take you in to their homes and don't know you from Adam. Like any other country, you have your snobs and assholes. One of the things I really like about Nicaragua is when you ask a straight question they are direct. No pretty pictures just the facts. If you are one of those that want someone to kiss you ass just because you are a N. American, can't live without the corner 7/11,Wal Mart, hot water, losing electricity and water on occasion, impatient, get your feeling hurt very easy, ill health, and can't stand a little pressure then this may not be the place for you. It will be a long time before this place become another Costa Rica. Anyone that lives here can tell you that. Another good reason for living here is there are only 4000 N. American residents here so it is not totally spoiled. We know several people that are in the process of moving to Nicaragua and they are coming for all the right reasons. They are coming here to LIVE. They accept things as they are and the only thing they want to change is their lives and they have a pretty good one to began with. They had the good sense to come and check it out and then make their decision. They didn't listen to rumors or a bunch of BS. They will be and asset to the country. This message is addressed to the Expat Exchange and to no one else. You have the option to read it or not read it. These are the reasons we moved to Nicaragua.

Latest Replies: glockdiver69: Thanks majicjack! It looks like you are a well grounded person and obviously happy with you decision to move to Nica. I am sure many agree with some (or a lot) of what you said. Also, thanks for your service in Vietnam.

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I agree with everything but the hot water .. . I didn't post the link because I didn't want our nattering nabob of negativity and Nicaragua business expert to get on there and start telling everyone why, exactly, their plans in Nicaragua were hopelessly doomed to abject failure: "If You Build It, No One Will Come"

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I agree with him.

If you, meaning You, John Shepard, have some fantasy of fixing Nicaragua and its culture and its politics and trying to turn everyone into little brown North Americans, then you'll fail. This guy is telling you more or less I've been saying, though I don't think I would find running a farm much fun. Andy has been telling you similar things.

You want to be the center of attention pretty much anywhere, buying your way into people's lives. This gets old fast anywhere.

This guy is doing the opposite of what you're talking about doing -- he's accepting Nicaragua is what it is and adjusts his life to that.

There are other ways of living in Nicaragua but hanging with the Pellases takes more money than I suspect you really have.

Rebecca Brown

Hmmm...

Blog was written by a someone who objects to the social welfare of the USA yet is "loving all things Nicaraguan"....typical of someone who can move here with enough money to not be bothered by all that.

Many Nicaraguans are also "tired of paying higher taxes for babies that are not theirs", having businesses over regulated and over taxed and supporting those that could but won't work".

"The president and attorney general are as crooked as snakes and totally ignore the constitution. The only thing politicians are in office for anymore is a power trip". (I forgot which country he was referring to!!)

Money is a great insulator from many realities

Basically the blog entry was someone who decided to ignore things in Nicaragua that he wasn't ignoring in the US, and who was happy that there are only about 4,000 American expats here (apparently per UN stats from here: http://migrationpolicy.org/programs/data-hub/charts/international-migran... -- use the drop down menu to pick a country). More people from the US settled in Puerto Rico than all of Central America (189,000 to 50,000) with Belize the lowest number of US immigrants and Nicaragua second lowest at 4,000. More Nicaraguans are in Costa Rica than people from the US by 304,000 to 13,000, and Costa Rica also has more Panamanians as people from the US (14,000 to 13,000).

The other CA countries that are smaller in land area than Nicaragua which have more migrants from the US are Guatemala at 8,000; El Salvador and Honduras at 5,000 each. CR and Panama are the only ones in the low five digits. Ecuador has 39,000, so about the same as CA minus Panama, don't know what the comparative land areas would be but some of Ecuador is very high mountains, so not as easy to settle.

Rebecca Brown

He Was Talking US

president and attorney general. "Crooked" is clearly in the eye of the beholder.

As MagicJack says, there IS more freedom in Nicaragua, you just have to understand how, what, and where. I made my peace with the Transito some time back; we wave to each other, I buy them gaseosas once in a while, other than that, I seem to be, and have been, getting along just fine. MagicJack sounds like he enjoys his active life here too. I just wish I had a neat nickname like his.

I'm "buying my way" again tomorrow night, taking all my employees and extended family to the Circus in Estelí. I pay them well, but it's not much. If this is buying my way into their lives, well, I plead guilty. It's also my way of saying Thank You for their loyalty and hard work.

The logistics of getting from the campo and back at night are impossible, last bus up is now 4PM. This is an opportunity they would never have. We're going in the truck I just imported, and my Highlander, probably thirty-five of us total.

It's my life, I live it as I please, and I find it more rewarding than I would sitting on my (or more accurately, your) fat ass watching some stupid fish swim around . . .

Did I EVER say anything about hanging with the Pellas', or is this another manic delusion of yours?