Why are so many migrants here in the first place?

The question is being asked from the US perspective. While immigration to the US is not just from Latin America, there is clearly where the big numbers come from. Many articles try to justify immigration by saying "we need them". Maybe the US does -- or the price of California lettuce would go up -- but that doesn't address why they see the US as the land of opportunity.

An article in Truth-Out tosses in enough history so you can put the pieces together. You may not like where the article leads.

To understand this situation, it’s helpful to start with El Salvador’s 12-year civil war, which was to become the most costly U.S. intervention in Latin America.

The United States spent $1 million a day funding death squads and a far-right military government in efforts to ward off the spread of communism and “another Nicaragua.” As a result, the country was traumatized by massive human rights violations and the death of 75,000 people. But perhaps what really tipped the scales was the formation of U.S.-funded private development organizations like FUSADES, which furthered neoliberal programs inside the country. The United States has also meddled in elections and set preconditions for U.S. aid that incentivizes — one might say bribes — politicians to open up the country to foreign multinationals. The recent enactment of the public-private partnership law, for example, grants “the government the right to sell off natural resources, infrastructure and services to foreign multinationals.”

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Details

But, the devil is (almost always) in the details. Coyotes do not regularly deal in the fake legit papers themselves, more so in delivery - and the after delivery payments (avoiding papers avoids fraud and possible document-related perjury offenses). Being deported on drug charges is vastly different than being deported on virtually no, or some other, charges. Call me cynical, but if you rarely expect to hear the truth, when pressed, and living in C.A. (I rarely expect that), you even less so expect the same when dealing with deportations. Talking to deportees is a sad, very SAD, mix of tragedy and comedy - usually, little else.

The premise is that being

The premise is that being granted legal status is the reparations for decades of American imperialism, meddling and globalism. That's a different look at the illegal immigrant issue, which I don't think will gain much traction with the average American.

My in-laws might be migrating, but they chose Canada over USA. They said the people are more friendly in Canada, and it's easier to move to.

Evidence and options

The basic problem is that this is unfounded opinion, nonsense really, at least in the classical sense. It isn't, automatically, false. But, nothing in the article begins to justify this conclusion regarding negative impact. In fact, it is even possible for one to accept the general premise, even most of all it entails per imperialism and emigration, and yet still reject this conclusion. No evidence at all is presented here. Imagine all that must be true for the claim that everyone who leaves El Salvador creates a direct negative impact (wouldn‘t one need to actually know something of both the economy -international and national and regional- of El Salvador and the U.S.) - the claim requires a ton of statistical data, none of which is even hinted at here. Any serious analysis of U.S. immigration needs to include a serious treatment of at least four things: people coming out of sheer economic desperation (though mostly on immigrant, not asylum visas); people who come, for whatever reason, and make a go of it and for the lack of a better word, succeed - regardless of how succeed is defined (but those who do, certainly do not regret it), but to those who do, that is their word choice; people coming for any reason who later reject their previous assumptions and return to their home country (only rarely does any outfit tout the fact that so many people voluntarily go back home, annually), people who come based on unrealistic or even childish assumptions who cannot, for whatever reason, go back home and more or less end up trapped here - and make do. Three excellent documentary films, not necessarily supporting any particular agenda, etc., and each being more valuable than any one book on the topic, are: Mark Becker’s 2005 graduate degree film, “Romantico”, the 2009 Roy Germano expose, “The Other Side of Immigration”, and the brutally honest, “De Nadie” (a.k.a., “Border Crossing”) by Tin Dirdamal.

Harvest of Empire

There is a book and a documentary, Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America by Juan Gonzales.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORz75JKlJ5g

That Article Is SO

bogus. There are people from every country in the world in the US, and millions more would come if they had the opportunity.

There are Brits working in the boat business in Florida, east Europeans who jumped off cruise ships (lot of them working in the restaurants and bars of Key West -English skills got them on the cruise ships), Canadians selling real estate, Somali's driving taxis.

The article doesn't address why people come to the US -often at great cost- and doesn't address the success many of them enjoyed. I did business with a Salvadoreno in Los Angeles years ago, he had built a nice life for his family, was saving his pennies to buy a house. He's more typical than the MS 13 gang member who is deported back to El Salvador.

If the lefties would just once tell the whole story, and tell it accurately, they would enjoy more credibility.

Not everyone has the wonderful experiences in the US

Mexican are returning to Mexico in the same numbers that arrive in the US -- net migration zero: http://www.pewhispanic.org/2012/04/23/net-migration-from-mexico-falls-to... in 2012.

Some of them have the success. Some don't. There's a woman on my block who's a small scale clothing importer and vendor who tried to move to the US. Her coyotes failed to get her "the papers" and she was deported back to Nicaragua having borrowed on her house to pay the coyotes. A woman here who I hadn't heard anything good about before hearing this loaned her the money to buy her house back and get set up again importing clothes. She has her house back.

Given that nobody from Nicaragua who isn't prosperous and with ties here can even get a visa to visit the U, getting people out who might thrive in the US but who aren't middle class here is close to impossible to do legally. Even things like the Fulbright scholarships require people to leave the US for two years before coming back.

One advantage of moving to another culture is escaping the biases of your home culture -- a Ulster Catholic might well do better in the US than in the UK; I've met a Belgian guy who was of the language community in the minority in Belgium who did very well in the US. In Australia, American blacks are magical creatures, no real bigotry against them, from what Australian friends say. A poor smart kid often does better outside where he was born and reared. A few of us have some sense of the class and regional implications of various UK accents, but not many in the US, so Irish isn't loaded these days, but is still a protected minority category in the UK.

Rebecca Brown

Deportation

What was the basis of the deportation (it matters)?

The woman on my block?

The coyotes couldn't deliver legal papers or legal enough looking papers, apparently. She and her group got nailed just inside the border. Didn't talk to her myself, just heard about it from an NGO worker who also lives on the block. Sounds realistic enough.

I know of others who were deported for pot sales even after a marriage and a child in the US (the guy who was killed here by Givner). One of the missions hires the deportees as translators.

I think some of this is that the US does sell itself as the land of opportunity, and $125 a month for a bed in a slum house sounds reasonable if a person is sharing a bed here.

Rebecca Brown

Details

But, the devil is (almost always) in the details. Coyotes do not regularly deal in the fake legit papers themselves, more so in delivery - and the after delivery payments (avoiding papers avoids fraud and possible document-related perjury offenses). Being deported on drug charges is vastly different than being deported on virtually no, or some other, charges. Call me cynical, but if you rarely expect to hear the truth, when pressed, and living in C.A. (I rarely expect that), you even less so expect the same when dealing with deportations. Talking to deportees is a sad, very SAD, mix of tragedy and comedy - usually, little else.

I have heard from other sources

….that some coyotes simply deliver their customers to MIGRA. Repeat business if it can be arranged so that the clients don't realize that. Don't know.

I know of two deportees, both who had US families, who got "can't come back for X number of years." The woman I know better followed her husband to Mexico, then did a U turn and came back to the US, hasn't talked about why.. The other was the guy killed here. His wife and son are still in the US.

An apparent nastier deportee showed up on the FB group for Granada expats -- two of us who've been here for a while tried to talk some silly woman out of arguing with him ad threatening him with prosecution for animal cruelty.

I've had more trouble with lying gringos than lying Nicaraguans, but I could have run into that recently -- someone claimed to be a friend of mine's sister a few days ago, and then tried to sell me a ring today. I can check with the friend, but they really don't look alike.

Rebecca Brown

Two Good Movies

about the long trip north, La Bestia:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOw5YEIg-t4

and,, Sin Nombre:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qVIiqP9gw4

If you're looking for happy endings, watch something else, like Entre Nos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xfq5Vm3KuV0

Another Perspective

http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2014/03/27/twenty-three-texas-teac...

For many people the US is still the land of opportunity (although I don't know if I'd live in Houston)::

" ...The teachers, some of whom received their master’s degree in the U.S. and were recruited from other districts in the country, had been promised that once their visa expired they would receive legal residency. . .

“We are more worried about our legal status because we want to continue to work legally,” Bernardo Montes-Rodriguez, 41, who faces deportation in September when his visa expires, told the Morning-News. “I prefer to lose that money if we get the green card. That’s what we were promised.” , ,,

The money was the $20K H -1B visa application , ...by the time it was discovered that the teachers could not apply, the application had to come from the employer, time to apply for permanent residency was no longer sufficient.

These are precisely the people we should NOT be deporting . . . .this has been the most inept administration since Jimmy Carter.

Migrants, Deportation and El Salvador....

This sounds like job for the Magnet Lady.... "sad, very SAD, mix of tragedy and comedy - usually, little else".