Piedra cantera wall

Piedra cantera wall

Note side is usual sloppy finish but street front is decorated by carving designs in the stone. This one also has intermedio--a horizontal layer of rebar and cement to make it stronger.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

yellow?

yellow piedra cantera?

"Maybe, just once, someone will call me 'sir' without adding, 'you're making a scene." -Homer J. Simpson

gray usually

from the 2 quarries that provide most in Esteli area.

"Anything that is complex is not useful and anything that is useful is simple. This has been my whole life's motto."

Mikhail Kalashnikov, Russian inventor

Is There Any

price advantage to going to the source for the stones?

Or, are you better off dealing locally? Has the price of the stone stayed steady?

I've noticed land prices seem to be going down a bit ?? ?

It's very hard to compare land since it's always apples and oranges, and seller motivation plays a key role too.

Haven`t bought stone lately

but price is dependent heavily on shipping costs, and the main quarries serving Esteli are near Boaco and points south.. Quality is also a factor because different quarries have `differerent mineral content.. I`d deal locally and hand pick my stones. If buying by the truckload you might save a little, but I would have a reliable driver inspecting the stone as it is loaded. You should also be aware of the quality of the stone from that quarry before you order.

Land prices are a crap shoot--how hard you bargain and how many months or years you are willing to wait are probably bigger factors that short term market fluctuations. In a booming but cash-strapped society rural land is a buyers market but some sellers haven`t figured that out yet. Asking prices on land that has recently been improved by paved roads, water projects, has been rising but I think that is more a matter of the improvements than anything to do with the land itself.

"Anything that is complex is not useful and anything that is useful is simple. This has been my whole life's motto."

Mikhail Kalashnikov, Russian inventor

...

I would hate to use that stuff for a retaining wall in an earthquake- or hurricane-prone area unless it has been heavily reinforced.

Rural land prices in my part of Nicaragua, Carazo, have not fluctuated recently but rural properties have not been selling, except for those close to large cities that can be turned into housing lots.

On rare occasions a Nicaraguan will sell rural land at a big discount from market value but only if her or she is jammed up in a big way and are desperate to lay their hands on money without delay. In those cases you have to be right there with the cash on hand and are prepared in advance to move quick.

If you want to buy rural land at comparatively low prices you need to cast a wide net, be prepared to wait for a couple of years for the right deal, have the patience to look into lots of offers that turn out to be too good to be true, and have an honest, diligent hard-working lawyer teed up.

If you find a deal like this, insist that the property be unoccupied by anyone before you hand over the cash. Do not under any circumstances agree to "inherit" the previous owner's cuidador; as a condition of sale insist that the cuidador has already been paid off and has left the property.

Yes, One Of

the problems I understand with Piedra Cantera is the difficulty in incorporating rebar.

If the stone were grooved, which would seem easy enough to do . . .then you could get some rebar in place to keep it from toppling over.

It would still require a big dollop of la Fe to use it for any structural purpose, as well as mortar.

Just fill

Most construction in Nicaragua is something structural with some kind of fill. This is true whether you are talking wood, brick, block or piedra cantera. The advantages of piecra cantera are that it does not rot and that each piece is bigger than a brick or a block thus decreasing the labor and mortar needed.

...

Wouldn't you be able to reinforce with rebar by drilling right into it?

Piedra is cheap because it is soft

and easy to quarry. Softer than Nicaragua`s soft bricks. Soft, heavy, cheap, and pretty if it is done right.

"Anything that is complex is not useful and anything that is useful is simple. This has been my whole life's motto."

Mikhail Kalashnikov, Russian inventor

Not Sure

I like the look of the stone for a wall, and it's less money than block and stucco.

I'm not a mason. The block has a grove that accepts the rebar and some extra morta. As I remember the piedra canterra is relatively soft, should be easy to groove

I saw some being quarried out of stone at low tide in Pochomil, using just iron hand tools. Loaded onto a waiting donkey cart.

It was clear from the tidal flat that these guys had taken quite a few stones over time.

rebar

I once talked to a foreigner whose contractor was drilling piedra to insert rebar. Seems like a cultural thing: I would use block and do it right. He was also quite close to a good quarry which probably whacked off about 1/3 of the cost of the stone.

Piedra is decorative and can only exist as a structural member in a country without building codes to protect the public. You pay your nickel and takes your choice.

I use it for driveways in full sun or for foundations. I might someday use it for a minifalda because I like the look, but I would make it pretty and use lots of rebar like this guy.

"Anything that is complex is not useful and anything that is useful is simple. This has been my whole life's motto."

Mikhail Kalashnikov, Russian inventor