Regional Crime Comparision

InSight Crime has an article that compares crime in Nicaragua to other countries in the region. The punchline is that besides being lower, most of it isn't even where you are likely to be -- unless you are running drugs.

While Managua is, as you would expect, Nicaragua's most violent city, it is not the most dangerous area based on per capita homicide rates.

According to Granera, the most violent region is the remote Autonomous Region of the Southern Atlantic, or RAAS (see picture), with a rate of 42.7 homicides per 100,000 people in 2011, comparable to Nicaragua's national rate of 12 murders per 100,000 inhabitants. Neighboring Guatemala has a rate of 43 homicides per 100,000.

The police chief said several other departments have murder rates on par with those seen in Europe, including Carazo, Leon, and Madriz, which saw rates of 2.2, 4.3, and 3.3, respectively.

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Managua

In Managua the criminality is focuses, I mean everybody knows the neighborhood are not allow to visit, especially during the night, El reparto Shick, San Judas, El Mercado Oriental area, Jorge Dimitrov, etc. !

It's true in the USA too

Everybody knows where not to go, especially at night, in Philly, NYC, Atlanta, Chicago, LA, &c. That is, everybody that lives there. Much can be judged by how nice & well-maintained the houses are in a neighborhood, but not always.

It'd be useful to see areas of Managua rated from 0 (take out life insurance before entering) to 10 (it's OK to walk about looking rich). For instance, I often wonder about Bella Horizonte and the area around Tiscapa-Plaza Inter-Crown Plaza- with several embassies. How about stepping outside of Metro Centro to walk across the street & up to the Hilton - 2 or 3 blocks? Stupid?

metrocentro

I´ve walked around there a little in early evening. Locals say it is relatively safe. later at night I would stay in. Heard of one foreigner who got hassled by a wino/street crazy by the gas station by the super but that can be urban grunge anywhere. Don´t chat with winos, in fact, you should be on orange alert anytime a wino is within 21 feet of you.

Last time i stayed at Managua Backpackers, 2 fwf s got robbed. Seems if you are going to walk from the guest house to the annex, walk around the block towards Metrocentro, an area of middle class families sitting in their yards, vigilantes, etc. These guys walked around the block the other way and when they got to the dark corner with some empty lots they were robbed by ´´10´´ young men, at least 1 with a knife. It becomes a situational awareness thing: If the normal people aren´t out you should not be out, inquire locally, and if you see something you don´t like 1/2 block away, turn around.

I´ve been wanting to go to Mercado Oriental. We went once with a stocky middled aged Nica friend. He left us with the truck in an area he thought was safe and nervously walked to the market, did his purchases quickly and returned. All stuff in the bed of the truck was secure by rope to help head off stoplight grab-and -run. My wife says inside the problem is pickpockets as there is some kind of security. Best bet seems to carry a dummy wallet and go as a group inside with somebody asigned as rear guard and pay special attention when leaving through the public streets and sidewalks. I´ll post if we ever get down there for shopping.

"You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality." Ayn Rand

...

"I´ve been wanting to go to Mercado Oriental. We went once with a stocky middled aged Nica friend. He left us with the truck in an area he thought was safe and nervously walked to the market, did his purchases quickly and returned. All stuff in the bed of the truck was secure by rope to help head off stoplight grab-and -run. My wife says inside the problem is pickpockets as there is some kind of security. Best bet seems to carry a dummy wallet and go as a group inside with somebody asigned as rear guard and pay special attention when leaving through the public streets and sidewalks. I´ll post if we ever get down there for shopping."

I've shopped several times now at Mercado Oriental. I observed all the normal precautions and never felt slightly threatened. Don't flash big wads of bills, keep your wallet in a pocket that's buttoned up, don't wear a watch or start yakking on your cell-phone, etc. There are always tons of people around during daytime. There's a Texaco station near one of the entrances where you can park your car safely for 20 cords per hour. Yeah it's a good idea to go with one other person. That's about it.

geeze..i have lived in managua..

since 1998..im glad u guys are telling me how dangerous it is..i'll have to be more careful ..mike..on the parking in the texaco..yep its safe..but its usally crowded and real easy for a fender bender..if ure not buying a lot..park at plaza inter and catch a cab..during the day i walk all around the plaza inter tica bus area..never had a problem..i think a lot of u guys are paranoid

...

Good tip. I feel safe walking around plaza inter too. I recommend Hotel El Conquistador in that zone that's pretty good value in the $45 per night range.

RAAS . . .

. . . is a waystation on the narco-super-highway, Caribbean & Gulf of Mexico, from Columbia to the United States & Mexico (for easier distribution to the US). The narco-gangs give the mostly indigenous residents of RAAS a simple choice: plata o plomo. (Like the old "to make 'em an offer they couldn't refuse.") The gangs fast-boats and sophisticated electronics make them nearly untouchable by the Nica navy. Of course the sparse population of the mostly primative region inflates the statistic.

There's been very little real infrastructure development of RAAS & RAAN, the territorial majority of Nicaragua, since the days of when it was a British protectorate and the king of the Miskitos was the acknowledged leader of the region. The narco-gangs great wealth & true power seems to promise a dark future for that vast region of Nicaragua.

Most of the busts touted by Nica police have been of shipments coming in from the west cost (SJdS) & CR.

Police Chiefs comments, AGM this week.

Nicaragua's homicide rate down 13 to 12 per 100,000 population "lowest rate in Central America".

Dismantled 295 criminal groups and seized 2,186 firearms and rescued 196 victims of human trafficking.

The homicide rate in Nicaragua is 12 per 100,000 inhabitants, which represents the

The police chief warned, however, that in the South Atlantic Autonomous Region (RAAS), the homicide rate is 42 per 100,000 inhabitants, higher than average.

In contrast, in the province of Carazo, in the Pacific, is 2.2 per 100,000 inhabitants, the lowest.

"In Managua there is a homicide every two days.

2011 saw an Increase in traffic fatalities: 613 deaths, up 7.4% over 2010.

2011 there were 840 deaths from homicide and murder.

In the report, the police chief said that last year they seized seven tons of cocaine, broke up 21 international drug trade cells, confiscated five million dollars and arrested 3,300 people involved in that activity.

Any idea why Carazo would be so low?

Leon also seem rather low.

Rebecca Brown

León, jodido

León is a church & university town. You can still walk through the downtown area at midnight or 2 AM with no fear of being assaulted. Every couple of blocks, it seems, there's a gorgeous classical church. On Sunday downtown is empty. Many hit the nearby beach. Students go home for a square meal. The students are well-behaved and a welcome infusion of young blood. It's rare to see drunken obnoxious types, like you can most any night on la Calzada in Granada.

It's the exurbs that are dangerous, relatively. They give numbers to the stats. If you're looking for a fight that's where to go.

On that note, wouldn't it be useful to see crime demographically mapped, so one could see at a glance where not to go in Managua, say? Of course, living in any place long enough, you know.

...

The people of Carazo are famous throughout Nicaragua for their lack of initiative.

lmao

You are rigtht except on the fishing towns, were these fishermen are a beast at work, 7 days a week, starting at 4:30 AM, I just spent 3 days with them(putting together an Acopio in Carazo). BTW mike shot me a PM, I will need a crap load of Ice man, I will need about 200 quintales(20,000 pounds) per month once I get going strong .

....

Felix, if you want to talk about ice, shoot me your e-mail address, I've lost it.

People of Leon

What a fun thread idea!

What are the local stereotypes about different cities or regions?

I've been told by my BIL that Leon is famous for skipping out on the restaurant bill!

When we went to Masaya for lunch at the hilltop tourist spot, everybody got up and went outside when the fog cleared. That when my BIL jokingly said, we should tell them we are from Leon.

One of my Nicaraguan friends told me this one

In Granada, people roll their car windows up so other people will think they have air-conditioning. In Leon, people roll their car windows up so other people will think they're from Granada.

Rebecca Brown